LIMBA Freight victory

LIMBA Rail Freight Initiative-  A Big Win for Long Island

Many months ago LIMBA invited the principals of the new Brookhaven Rail Terminal to make a presentation of their proposed plans.

 

This week we experienced what on the surface looks like a small victory. It was in fact a great beginning. The Brookhaven Rail Terminal opened on Sills Rd, Yaphank. This is a facility that was built when all the pundits were saying that it didn’t stand a chance.

 

LIMBA has been advocating for more robust rail freight service for many years, and the progress was almost nil until now. This 28 acre facility has an adjoining 80 acres available for expansion. It will handle 500,000 tons of construction material, but by 2016 it will be handling a million tons of goods. With further build-out it will handle much more. In the present configuration BRT expects to remove 20,000 trucks from the LIE in the first year.

 

Our advocacy calls for at least 2 more facilities such as this. Fully developed these transload yards will remove 300,000 trucks from the expressway

 

The parties that need to be congratulated are many but here are few. Supervisor Lesko for his vision and cooperation, Pratt Bros. Construction for the creation of the site and US Rail for funding and operating this enterprise. US Rail had the full cooperation of Helena Williams, president of LIRR and NY & Atlantic Railroad, the rail freight operator on Long Island. The Yaphank Civic Association cooperated and asked for some concessions on the physical appearance of the site with tree plantings that surround the operation. Judy White of C12 Communications has been assisting the company from the beginning and did a remarkable job of assembling an enthusiastic chorus of support, and Long Island has won a big job enhancing entity. I will ask her to bring the principals back to LIMBA and have them restate their plans for future development. Meanwhile, congratulations to all.

 

 

 

LIMBA Freight victory

LIMBA Rail Freight Initiative-  A Big Win for Long Island

Many months ago LIMBA invited the principals of the new Brookhaven Rail Terminal to make a presentation of their proposed plans.

 

This week we experienced what on the surface looks like a small victory. It was in fact a great beginning. The Brookhaven Rail Terminal opened on Sills Rd, Yaphank. This is a facility that was built when all the pundits were saying that it didn’t stand a chance.

 

LIMBA has been advocating for more robust rail freight service for many years, and the progress was almost nil until now. This 28 acre facility has an adjoining 80 acres available for expansion. It will handle 500,000 tons of construction material, but by 2016 it will be handling a million tons of goods. With further build-out it will handle much more. In the present configuration BRT expects to remove 20,000 trucks from the LIE in the first year.

 

Our advocacy calls for at least 2 more facilities such as this. Fully developed these transload yards will remove 300,000 trucks from the expressway

 

The parties that need to be congratulated are many but here are few. Supervisor Lesko for his vision and cooperation, Pratt Bros. Construction for the creation of the site and US Rail for funding and operating this enterprise. US Rail had the full cooperation of Helena Williams, president of LIRR and NY & Atlantic Railroad, the rail freight operator on Long Island. The Yaphank Civic Association cooperated and asked for some concessions on the physical appearance of the site with tree plantings that surround the operation. Judy White of C12 Communications has been assisting the company from the beginning and did a remarkable job of assembling an enthusiastic chorus of support, and Long Island has won a big job enhancing entity. I will ask her to bring the principals back to LIMBA and have them restate their plans for future development. Meanwhile, congratulations to all.

 

 

 

Martin Luther King Jr – 2014

MLK – Thoughts of this day.

When Barak Obama was elected president there were tears of hope and a sense that something was happening  that was a few years ago unthinkable, a black president.

There were some that were less enthusiastic, but I believe the majority of Americans saw his presidency as a positive. But we all seemed to fall into a trap that now everything would turn out right and America has come to a point where there was no turning back. History does not work that way. There are steps forward and there are setbacks, but even as Dr. King himself said “The arc of the moral universe is long but it bends toward justice.”

So while most of us read the harsh tone of the disenchanted with dismay, we must keep the faith. There is a belief that I harbor in my mind that says that things will be better. The stereotypes that those of us who are older were so used to expressing are no longer in our vocabulary. Those thoughts are relegated to the dust-bin of history. That last statement is true, but it is not universal. There are some that will take the feelings of prejudice for gays, blacks, Jews, Italians, and everything that they are not, to their graves. But we will all go to our graves some day and that leaves a generation that knew and felt less prejudice to go on.

Young people today have less likelihood of being prejudiced, partly because many in my generation held their tongues. Perhaps we were being “politically correct” but that term is not a pejorative. If we kept our narrow-minded opinions to ourselves, we were doing our children a favor. We were allowing them to make judgments on their own. If we admonished our friends gently by smiling and saying simply “not funny” when they told a joke that belittled one group or another, we furthered the goal of acceptance. In order to help others see the hurt they are inflicting we need not be condescending.

Martin Luther King Jr was a champion of civil rights, but few people understood the workings of the minds of those that would disenfranchise him. The course he chose to change this nation was dangerous to him and his followers, but there was no other course he could have taken that would have been more effective. Had he lived to the day when he could have inflicted damage to his detractors, I believe he would not have.

Nelson Mandela did live to see the day when he held the reigns of power, but did not retaliate. I believe Dr. King would have been equally forgiving.

Ernie Fazio