Ray Tierney – Candidate for Suffolk District Attorney

Ray Tierney is a Republican Conservative Candidate for Suffolk County District Attorney.

Ray’s Plan to Bring Integrity and Combat Rising Violent Crimes

Having prosecuted thousands of cases in his 26-year career, Ray will bring integrity and experience to the DA’s Office to stem the rise in violent crimes to keep our residents and streets safe from violent gang members, drug dealers and sex traffickers.

  • Have zero tolerance for bail and parole violators. He will work to repeal New York’s failed bail reform.
  • Re-establish the DA’s Gang Unit and Suffolk’s Gang Task Force.
  • Expand the DA’s White Collar Crime Bureau to combat identity theft and cybercrimes.
  • With a reputation for non-partisanship, Ray will bring integrity to the DA’s Office that has been plagued for decades by politically motivated prosecutions.

Suffolk County Assistant District Attorney

Raymond A. Tierney graduated from Brown University in 1988, and St. John’s University Law School in 1992. He worked for 14 years as an Assistant District Attorney in Suffolk County. During his career in Suffolk, he investigated and prosecuted cases involving organized crime, street gangs, murders, and other violent street crimes. He also investigated political corruption, domestic violence, child abuse, and child pornography. These prosecutions included long-term investigations in which he supervised the efforts of designated teams of detectives utilizing wiretaps, search warrants, and grand jury investigations in order to uncover criminal activity and bring those responsible to justice.

While at the D.A.’s office he prosecuted Austen Offen and Constantine Chronis for the beating of Shane Daniels outside a Hamptons nightclub in 1996. Offen beat the victim into a coma with the car security device known as the “Club” while Chronis, an active NYPD officer, held the crowd back with his service revolver.

Assistant United States Attorney

In 2008, he joined the United States Attorney’s Office for the Eastern District of New York. While there, he oversaw complex criminal investigations and prosecuted violations of federal criminal law, including cases involving the Colombian Norte del Valle cartel responsible for importing over 50 tons of cocaine into the United States.

He also was responsible for prosecuting international white-collar cases such as a case against a call center in India utilized to contact and swindle millions of dollars from U.S. citizens in so-called “IRS Payment” scams.

Much of his time in the U.S. Attorney’s Office was devoted to the trial and conviction of numerous members of the MS-13 street gang for the commission of murders and other violent crimes on Long Island. He drafted and applied for search and arrest warrants, presented evidence to federal grand juries, prepared and filed indictments, engaged in pretrial discovery, litigated pretrial matters by motion and pretrial hearings, and conducted jury trials and sentencing hearings putting hundreds of dangerous MS-13 members behind bars.

Among the cases Ray participated in were the trials of Brentwood MS-13 leader Heriberto Martinez and Carlos Ortega, who together were responsible for the commission of five murders over a five-week period in 2010. This included the murders of 19-year-old Vanessa Argueta and her two-year-old son Diego Torres in Central Islip.

Both defendants were convicted of all counts in the indictment and are currently serving life sentences. Ray later tried MS-13 member Adalberto Guzman for shooting two-year-old Diego. Thanks to Ray and his team, Guzman is serving a life sentence. These five murders, in three separate counties, remained unsolved until federal authorities assumed prosecution of the cases.
Ray also met and coordinated with Department of Justice officials regarding long-term international criminal prosecutions, and advised the United States Attorney General and President on the status of MS-13 prosecutions nationwide. His work was recognized by the president during the State of the Union address in 2018.

After the U.S. Attorney’s Office, he went to the Kings County District Attorney’s Office to run its Violent Criminal Enterprises Bureau, Crime Strategies Unit and Body-Worn Camera Unit.

Brooklyn Executive Assistant District Attorney

While in Brooklyn, he oversaw all aspects of long-term violent street gang investigations and prosecutions in the office and worked with the NYPD and federal partners on developing investigations to seize guns, prosecute gang murders, and allocate resources to dismantle the many criminal street gangs causing most of the violence in Brooklyn.

Labor Day Observations 2021

The labor movement has been a boon to the craftsmen and craftswomen in the western world. Let’s remind ourselves of the reasons why.
The standing of labor had its fits and starts and multiple setbacks, but the sense of what fairness is has a way of persevering.
The labor practices of the bad old days are quite stark. Child labor, particularly in coal mines were a scandal of epoch proportions. The coal mine companies liked using children in mines because they were small and could crawl into the narrow veins of coal, they were also fearless of the dangers, and they were utterly powerless. We otherwise think of the labor movement as a struggle to get fair wages and benefits and of course it is that. Of equal importance, it is the establishment of deserved respect for the working people of the countr
The only wealth that is ever created is with the brains in our heads and the skill of our hands. Other than that, there is no wealth. Wall street executives, corporate leaders, lawyers, and accountants are all able to demand good compensation and they all may very well be needed in our society, but they create no wealth.
On the other hand, that crew of workers that are finishing the work on your new house created a substantial amount of wealth. Are they fairly compensated? Perhaps, but what they get is what they are able to negotiate from the general contractor or by rules of the local union.
It is interesting that those people who spoke on the behalf of labor have for the most part have been laboring people themselves. But here is an intellectual sense of equitable treatment of our fellow citizens, and that is the motivation of people such as the Roosevelts. TR Roosevelt saw the trend to monopoly as a detriment of the common citizen. His efforts to curtail monopolies created competition which had the effect of making products less expensive and more available.
Franklin Roosevelt was the champion of the working class more directly. Were these men doing these things for their own political gain? Perhaps, but those are examples of political drives that are good for the country. I am more of the mind that personal values were the larger motivating factors for them.
FDR sought dignity for working people by having them create durable infrastructure such as the two draw bridges that were built in my childhood neighborhood on Jamaica Bay. They built very durable post office buildings as well as a number of other federal building projects. That is not all. Writers were employed to write plays and artists were asked to paint pictures depicting moments in American history in federally owned post offices. Young men were sent into the countryside to plant trees.
The point of these efforts was the recognition that there is dignity in work. We sometimes hear people speak about work as something to be avoided, it is not, it is something to be embraced, with the understanding that work should be properly compensated.
The closing point is there is dignity in work-all work. Enjoy your Labor Day.
Ernie Fazio

Labor Day Observations 2021

The labor movement has been a boon to the craftsmen and craftswomen in the western world. Let’s remind ourselves of the reasons why.

The standing of labor had its fits and starts and multiple setbacks, but the sense of what fairness is has a way of persevering.

The labor practices of the bad old days are quite stark. Child labor, particularly in coal mines were a scandal of epoch proportions. The coal mine companies liked using children in mines because they were small and could crawl into the narrow veins of coal, they were also fearless of the dangers, and they were utterly powerless. We otherwise think of the labor movement as a struggle to get fair wages and benefits and of course it is that. Of equal importance, it is the establishment of deserved respect for the working people of the country.

The only wealth that is ever created is with the brains in our heads and the skill of our hands. Other than that, there is no wealth. Wall street executives, corporate leaders, lawyers, and accountants are all able to demand good compensation and they all may very well be needed in our society, but they create no wealth.

On the other hand, that crew of workers that are finishing the work on your new house created a substantial amount of wealth. Are they fairly compensated? Perhaps, but what they get is what they are able to negotiate from the general contractor or by rules of the local union.

It is interesting that those people who spoke on the behalf of labor have for the most part have been laboring people themselves. But here is an intellectual sense of equitable treatment of our fellow citizens, and that is the motivation of people such as the Roosevelts. TR Roosevelt saw the trend to monopoly as a detriment of the common citizen. His efforts to curtail monopolies created competition which had the effect of making products less expensive and more available.

Franklin Roosevelt was the champion of the working class more directly. Were these men doing these things for their own political gain? Perhaps, but those are examples of political drives that are good for the country. I am more of the mind that personal values were the larger motivating factors for them.

FDR sought dignity for working people by having them create durable infrastructure such as the two draw bridges that were built in my childhood neighborhood on Jamaica Bay. They built very durable post office buildings as well as a number of other federal building projects. That is not all. Writers were employed to write plays and artists were asked to paint pictures depicting moments in American history in federally owned post offices. Young men were sent into the countryside to plant trees.

The point of these efforts was the recognition that there is dignity in work. We sometimes hear people speak about work as something to be avoided, it is not, it is something to be embraced, with the understanding that work should be properly compensated.

The closing point is there is dignity in work-all work. Enjoy your Labor Day.